GeForce Now’s paid subscription is doubling in price

Nvidia is effectively doubling the price of GeForce Now, its cloud streaming service. The company will add a new subscription tier on Thursday called Priority membership, which will cost $9.99 a month or $99.99 a year, Nvidia announced in a blog post.

GeForce Now allows people to play PC games that they already own via cloud streaming. The games themselves are hosted on Nvidia’s servers, then streamed to the player on devices of all kinds, such as computers, laptops, smartphones, tablets, and browsers. Players can stream games they own on platforms like Steam, the Epic Games Store, Battle.net, and Uplay — as long as GeForce Now supports the games in question.

Before Thursday’s membership changes, Nvidia offered two options for GeForce Now users. The free tier only required an Nvidia account, but limited playtime to one-hour sessions. The Founders tier, which cost $4.99 per month or $24.99 for six months, provided players with “priority access” to cloud servers, sessions of up to six hours, and ray-traced graphics.

The new Priority membership will take the place of the Founders option. Priority members will get the same features as Founders for the new twice-as-high price. This new membership option will open sometime on Thursday.

Customers who are already subscribed to the Founders tier — a group that “rapidly approaches 10 million members,” according to Nvidia — will be able to take advantage of a “Founders for Life” benefit. That will let Founders keep their existing $4.99/month price indefinitely, as long as their accounts are active and in good standing. The Founders membership debuted in February 2020, when Nvidia first brought GeForce Now out of beta after years of testing; the company has always said that it would only offer the Founders pricing for a limited time.

Nvidia also gave fans a preview on Thursday of some of the new features that it plans to add to GeForce Now in the near future, during the service’s second year of existence. These features include a larger library of games; more day-and-date releases; and an increase in the number and locations of data centers, in order to decrease latency for more of its players.

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